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Blind Men, an Elephant, and a King: The Problem of Soteriocentric Pluralism

Jonathan Wong

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The rise of immigration in the West has brought to the fore the issue about how the Christian church should relate to those in their midst of other faith traditions. The reigning paradigm in Western Christianity for interfaith relations has been pluralism, which is the view that all religions are essentially the same, with similar ends, and are equally valid. This essay seeks to challenge this assumption, examining the presuppositions that fuel this approach, showing how the seemingly “neutral” stance purported by its advocates is a fallacy. The author offers a different approach that seeks to take seriously the scriptural claims for the uniqueness of Christ, but also suggests a way to meaningfully engage with other faith traditions, without compromising what is essentially the foundation of Christianity—Jesus Christ.

 
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